Grand Old House Showcase: Flappers and Dappers Progressive Dinner
Events

Date/Time:
February 5, 2016 @ 6:30PM
Feb 2016
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Event Sponsors: Karen Donnelly and Thomas Strenge, Jeff Zumsteg and Jeff Linville, Susan Sommers and Larry Roeder, The Inn at 425 - Carl Markus Jr. and Stephan Zweifler, Bob Myers Properties, Clear 10 Vodka

GRAND OLD HOUSE SHOWCASE: FLAPPERS AND DAPPERS PROGRESSIVE DINNER, A BENEFIT FOR HISTORIC KANSAS CITY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE OLD HOUSE EXPO 2016

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH FROM 6:30 PM T0 9:00 PM

1920s ATTIRE ENCOURAGED

$75.00 PER PERSON

3400 GLADSTONE BOULEVARD

HORS d’OEUVRES AND SIGNATURE COCKTAILS HOSTED BY KAREN DONNELLY & THOMAS STRENGE

OWNERS OF THE MISSION STYLE ALL-LIMESTONE RECTANGLE HOME COMPLETED IN 1901

3223 GLADSTONE BOULEVARD – THE STEVENS HOUSE

PERIOD APPROPRIATE SUMPTUOUS DINNER HOSTED BY JEFF ZUMSTEG AND JEFF LINVILLE

IN THEIR 1902 COLONIAL REVIVAL HOME & WINNER OF THE 2008 HKC PRESERVATION AWARD

3240 NORLEDGE AVENUE – THE

WILLIAM CHICK SCARRITT MANSION – THE BROWNSTONE ON THE BLUFF

DESSERT ON THE THIRD FLOOR BALLROOM WITH DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY VIEWS HOSTED BY SUSAN SOMMERS &

LARRY ROEDER IN THEIR 1888 15TH & 16TH CENTURY INSPIRED RENAISSANCE CHATEAUESQUE HOME

425 GLADSTONE BOULEVARD – THE INN AT 425

AFTER PARTY WITH COFFEE AND APERITIFS HOSTED BY CARL MARKUS JR. & STEPHAN ZWEIFLER

AT THEIR AWARD WINNING QUEEN ANNE STYLE B&B BUILT IN 1888

3400 Gladstone Blvd – Home of Karen Donnelly and Thomas Strenge – Designed by Root and Siemens for James P. Townley, who was a Kansas City hardware magnate and president of J.P. Townley Metal and Hardware Company.  His company was located at 200 Walnut Street, then relocated to 216 Delaware Street in the River Market area.  Positioned at the corner of Indiana Ave and Gladstone Blvd, this Mission style all-limestone two-and-one-half-story rectangular home was completed in 1901. It features a limestone foundation, rusticated wall treatment and a hip roof.  A stone arch protrudes from the front porch with a Palladian window set into the third floor dormer.  Two prominent stone chimneys flank both sides of the home.

The home remained a single-family residence throughout the years.  Original staircase, hardwood floors and molding remain throughout the first floor, along with 4 original fireplaces including the inglenook beneath the landing at the rear of the reception hall.  Recent renovations include updating electrical, heating and cooling, as well as installation of a new kitchen.  Karen Donnelly and Thomas Strenge purchased the house in the spring of 2014 and continue with the renovations; including the roof and soffits, and 2nd floor Master bedroom, closet and bath.

3223 Gladstone Blvd -The Stevens House – Home of Jeff Zumsteg and Jeff Linville – Built as one of the few Colonial Revival residences in Kansas City’s Northeast area, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Stevens spent $45,000 on the construction of this home in 1902.  Architect L. Grant Middaugh designed the house which maintains its original architectural integrity and continues to elicit his vision of turn-of-the-century opulence.  Resting on limestone, the grand two-and-one-have story home was built of tan brick topped with a French tile roof.  Its most commanding feature is its large, two-tiered portico supported by four white fluted carved stone columns towering over twenty feet tall, crowned by a palladium window.  The home boasts one of the few surviving carriage houses in the Northeast which was among the first in Kansas City to be built to accommodate both horses and motorized vehicles from conception.

This 7800 square foot home has eight original fireplaces, six bedrooms and four original baths, plus a third floor ballroom complete with a musician’s stage. Birdseye maple flooring was utilized throughout the house, except for the music room and ballroom which are pine for acoustical reasons.  The massive twenty-two by thirty-five foot Grand Reception Hall show-cases a double-waterfall floating staircase with an original twelve foot by eight foot art-glass window above the landing.

Edward Stevens was a prominent Kansas City lawyer and commercial real estate investor.  Unfortunately, he passed away shortly after the house was completed.  His wife Ellen, and their two children continued to live in the house until her death in 1923.  The Stevens House has been lovingly maintained as a private residence throughout its 113 year history.  The current owner purchased the house in 2008 and oversaw an extensive renovation inside and out.  The renovation was recognized by the Historic Kansas City Foundation with the 2008 Historic Preservation Award and its nomination to the National Register of Historic Places is pending.

3240 Norledge Ave – William Chick Scarritt Mansion; The Brownstone On The Bluff – Home of Susan Sommers and Larry Roeder – Designed by John Wellborn Root of the nationally-famous Burnham and Root firm for William Chick Scarritt in 1888 for the cost of $30,000.  This Chateauesque-style home features French Gothic and Renaissance Chateaux influences of the 15th and 16th centuries.  The front brownstone was dominated by massive three-story rounded bay window with stained glass windows placed above.  With a recessed entrance on the right side doubling as a carriage entrance and a terrace on the left, it also features a steeply-pitched roof, four sculpted chimneys and irregularly-shaped dormers and copper accents on all four sides.

William Chick Scarritt was the son of Reverend Nathan Scarritt who owned and had platted the surrounding acreage high along the Missouri River Bluff.  William Chick Scarritt was a successful lawyer and highly respected throughout Kansas City.  By 1945 the mansion had changed hands and was being operated as a nursing home.  The nursing home was closed in 2002 due to substandard conditions and changed hands several times while continuing to deteriorate until purchased in 2009 by Susan Sommers and Larry Roeder.  They began the long process of converting the structure back into an elegant private residence..  This included rebuilding all 4 massive chimneys, restoring the West Terrace, installing a new slate roof, and remodeling a 1940’s rear addition as a copper-roofed conservatory based on 1890’s architecture.  They also stripped multiple layers of paint from original woodwork on all 3 levels, ultimately revealing eight different wood species.

Renovations included the installation of Italian plaster wall treatments, ceiling frescos and decorative stencil work.  They remodeled the kitchen, butler’s pantry and seven bathrooms.  Eight bedrooms have been restored along with two parlors, dining room, reception hall, a ballroom on the third floor with amazing views of the downtown skyline and wine cellar in the basement.  Currently they are reconstructing the carriage house on the foundation of the original 1888 carriage house, and completing renovations to the west lawn to include columned balustrade terraces and flower beds.

The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was the recipient of a 2012 Historic Kansas City Preservation Award.  Today the Brownstone On The Bluff stands as a testament to successful vision and restoration.

425 Gladstone Boulevard – The Inn at 425 was built in 1888 in the Queen Anne style and is now an award winning Bed and Breakfast. It is the former home of Judge Stephen and Emeline Twiss. Judge Twiss moved to Kansas City in the 1860s from Massachusetts (by way of Utah, where he penned the polygamy laws) where he practiced law and likely knew Abraham Lincoln. He married Emeline Bidwell, the first female president of a bank that catered to women. They are both buried in Elmwood Cemetery. Once a boarding house with 11 apartments, the home has been painstakingly restored over the past 20 years by owners Carl Markus Jr. and Stephan Zweifler.

This National Historic Landmark has been featured in Midwest Living, Kansas City Homes Beautiful, Kansas City Star Magazine and Kansas City Home and Garden.