News From HKC.

Document Archives

Young Preservationist Board Member Application

Over the past year, The Young Preservationist, KC (YP) has undergone several significant changes, and
we are writing today to share the exciting future we have in front of us for this organization. After
months of talking to other successful young boards in the Kansas City area the YP has decided on a
mission statement. The Young Preservationist organization will focus on raising awareness of
preservation activities in the community by supporting the parent organization Historic Kansas City;
while simultaneously offering a chance to meet new people, talk about the history of the built
environment in Kansas City, network and enjoy social events.

The main activities of the YP organization are the following:
• Bar Series (Quarterly Educational history lesson of historic bar in KC)
• Party Planning (Help parent organization HKC with annual social event)
• YP chosen annual advocacy issue (Guidance from HKC)
• Outreach for expanding YP membership

The YP Board will meet every other month in 2019, each meeting will be about 2 hours in duration. There
may also be some follow-up questions/discussions by email. The YP board will consist of approximately
6-8 people all under the age of 40 years old.

Historic Kansas City, as the parent organization, is looking to provide meaningful engagement and
leadership skills to the Young Preservationist Board members. We hope you consider joining the arsenal
of highly motivated volunteer talent that join young non-profit boards in Kansas City every day. Whether
you’re brand new to YP, or have been a member for a few years, we would like for you to consider
applying for a board role in the Young Preservationist. See attached forms. Please feel free to reach
out to us at HKCF@historickansascity.org if you have any additional questions. Also, check us out on our
Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/HistoricKC/

January 14, 2019

Plaza Bowl Sample Letter

Support a “protection” zoning overlay for the 47th Street corridor on the Plaza!! 

How you can help. Send a letter of support to Patty.Noll@kcmo.org. See example.

Over the years, the historic fabric of the Plaza has been slowly disappearing. It is under immediate threat due to “bottom line” driven development decisions that irresponsibly compromise the character of the Plaza by ignoring established city policy.

A majority of the Plaza area remains unprotected! An immediate implementation measure of the Midtown/Plaza Area Plan in 2016 was to codify the recommendations of the “Bowl Concept” as an ordinance, rather than as a guideline. In 2016, a portion of the “Bowl Concept” was implemented through a zoning amendment that includes part of the “base of the bowl”, essentially what Highwoods/Taubman owns. It caps the height in this area at 45 feet and restricts unwanted uses. A second expansion of the “Bowl Concept” was adopted along Main Street in 2018, with varied height/use restrictions.

 

January 10, 2019

2018 Preservation Awards Nomination Form

Historic Kansas City is accepting nominations for our annual Preservation Awards.  Award categories cover a broad array of preservation issues in order to encourage nominations from a wide range of professionals and disciplines.  Nominations are due Friday, February 15th 2019.  The nomination process is very simple—it will just take a few minutes of your time.   Please fill attached form and send to hkcf@historickansascity.org.

January 10, 2019

Plaza Bowl Overlay District – Expansion #3 – Staff Report_11_20_18

The purpose of the third expansion of the Plaza Bowl Overlay District is to establish land use regulations and limit building heights for an area generally along 47th Street.

January 03, 2019

Letter to UMKC — demolition Dickey Mansion Carriage House.

This morning HKC reached out to the Chancellor and Trustees of UMKC. See attached letter.

September 24th will mark the end of the large stately carriage house that was built in 1912 by Walter S. Dickey. The historic structure is being demolished to create an enhanced driveway for a planned addition for the School of Computing and Engineering.  Plans posted separately.

Historic Kansas City posted the scheduled demolition across our social media platforms twice in August, the response has been overwhelming.  The news has reached over 54,000 individuals, resulted in 420 comments and been “shared” well over 200 times. Also covered by local news outlets.

Please continue to share, as public awareness and feedback may help UMKC rethink a simplistic demolition plan to meet their educational space or driveway enhancement needs. We need to help them think more creatively to save a significant building related to the history of UMKC and the City. Further, other, more imaginative institutions have preserved their historic buildings while continuing their growth. They are not inconsistent.

Many have asked what they can do, and we encourage you to express your concerns and disappointment about the structure directly to: Chancellor Agrawal at chancellor@umkc.edu or 816 235-1101. Or, Troy Lillebo, Director of External Relations, Liaison to the UMKC Trustees, at lillebot@umkc.edu or 816-235-6585

As an institution supported by your tax dollars, tuition and alumni support, it is important that institutional leadership hear directly from constituents vested in preserving the historic fabric on the UMKC campus. Let your voice be heard.

August 28, 2018

This morning HKC released Plans for UMKC’s demolition Dickey Mansion Carriage House.   

September 24th will mark the end of the large stately carriage house that was built in 1912 by Walter S. Dickey. The historic structure is being demolished to create an enhanced driveway for a planned addition for the School of Computing and Engineering.  See attached plans.

Historic Kansas City posted the scheduled demolition across our social media platforms twice in August, the response has been overwhelming.  The news has reached over 54,000 individuals, resulted in 420 comments and been “shared” well over 200 times. Also covered by local news outlets.  This morning HKC reached out to the Chancellor and Trustees of UMKC. Letter is separate.

Please continue to share, as public awareness and feedback may help UMKC rethink a simplistic demolition plan to meet their educational space or driveway enhancement needs. We need to help them think more creatively to save a significant building related to the history of UMKC and the City. Further, other, more imaginative institutions have preserved their historic buildings while continuing their growth. They are not inconsistent.

As the carriage house for what is now known as Scofield Hall, the stone building sits just off Rockhill Road on 51st Street. It was part of the 20 acre estate and served as a garage, power plant and caretaker’s home. The stone for the carriage house was quarried on the site and the architect for the estate was Roger Gilman of Kansas City. Mr. Dickey died in 1931, and William Volker, who was interested in establishing the University of Kansas City (UKC), financed the purchase of the property to be given to the University. The mansion, greenhouse and carriage house were the first buildings operated by the University. In the 85 years of University ownership, the carriage house has been used for classrooms, offices, campus security and maintenance functions.

As an institution supported by your tax dollars, tuition and alumni support, it is important that institutional leadership hear directly from constituents vested in preserving the historic fabric on the UMKC campus. Let your voice be heard.

August 28, 2018

2017-18 HKC Most Endangered List

HKC announces our 2017 – 2018 Most Endangered list of buildings and other places around Kansas City at risk of being demolished or of crumbling into obscurity. We do this to draw attention to their plight, and in hopes of attracting new owners, developers, or community groups who will commit to restore, repurpose and maintain their unique appeal. These historic places are irreplaceable community assets that tell the story of the city and its development. The list is a non-exhaustive roster in no particular order and is a call for action by all stakeholders.

This year’s list reflects both the diversity of Kansas City’s historic places and the variety of threats they face. From African American sites to Modern Architecture, to historic resources in Westport, the Old Northeast area, the Country Club Plaza, to categories of resources including historic churches, apartment buildings, closed schools, and commercial neighborhood structures, and individual sites such as Epperson House or Sauer Castle.

For more on the Most Endangered List story – follow HKC on Facebook daily.

July 26, 2018